The mercy of God to the penitent
St. Maximus the Confessor




God’s will is to save us, and nothing pleases him more than our coming back to him with true repentance. The heralds of truth and the ministers of divine grace have told us this from the beginning, repeating it in every age. Indeed, God’s desire for our salvation is the primary and pre-eminent sign of his infinite goodness. Precisely in order to show that there is nothing closer to God’s heart than this, the divine Word of God the Father, with untold condescension, lived among us in the flesh, and died, suffered, and said all that was necessary to reconcile us to God the Father, when we were at enmity with him, and to restore us to the life of blessedness from which we had been exiled. He healed our physical infirmities by miracles; he freed us from our sins, many and grievous as they were, by suffering and dying, taking them upon himself as if he were answerable for them, sinless though he was. He also taught us in many different ways that we should wish to imitate him by our own kindness and genuine love for one another.

So it was that Christ proclaimed that he had come to call sinners to repentance, not the righteous, and that it was not the healthy who required a doctor, but the sick. He declared that he had come to look for the sheep that was lost, and that it was to the lost sheep of the house of Israel that he had been sent. Speaking more obscurely in the parable of the silver coin, he tells us that the purpose of his coming was to reclaim the royal image, which had been coated with the filth of sin. "You can be sure there is joy in heaven," he said, over one sinner who repents.

To give the same lesson he revived the man who, having fallen into the hands of the brigands, had been left stripped and half-dead from his wounds; he poured wine and oil on the wounds, bandaged them, placed the man on his own mule and brought him to an inn, where he left sufficient money to have him cared for, and promised to repay any further expense on his return.

Again, he told of how that Father, who is goodness itself, was moved with pity for his profligate son who returned and made amends by repentance; how he embraced him, dressed him once more in the fine garments that befitted his own dignity, and did not reproach him for any of his sins.

So too, when he found wandering in the mountains and hills the one sheep that had strayed from God’s flock of a hundred, he brought it back to the fold, but he did not exhaust it by driving it ahead of him. Instead, he placed it on his own shoulders and so, compassionately, he restored it safely to the flock.

So also he cried out: "Come to me, all you that toil and are heavy of heart. Accept my yoke," he said, by which he meant his commands, or rather, the whole way of life that he taught us in the Gospel. He then speaks of a burden, but that is only because repentance seems difficult. In fact, however, my yoke is easy, he assures us, and my burden is light.

Then again he instructs us in divine justice and goodness, telling us to be like our heavenly Father, holy, perfect and merciful. Forgive, he says, and you will be forgiven. Behave toward other people as you would wish them to behave toward you.





From a letter by St. Maximus the Confessor, abbot (Epist. 11: PG 92, 454-455)






by: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/lent/week4wednesdayor.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APRIL 9: PALM SUNDAY OF THE LORD'S PASSION
Dick Hauser, S.J.
These words of Jesus spoken while hanging on the cross are among the most disturbing words in the Gospels. Jesus’ cry of ...to be continued

 

APRIL 9: PALM SUNDAY OF THE LORD'S PASSION
Today we begin Holy Week, the days during which we journey with Jesus on his way of the cross and anticipate his ...to be continued

 

APRIL 2: FIFTH SUNDAY OF LENT - LAETARE SUNDAY
Father Albert Lakra
Out of the depths I call to you O Lord: Lord hear my cry. Listen ...to be continued

APRIL 2: FIFTH SUNDAY OF LENT
Our Gospel on this day, the fifth Sunday of Lent, is again taken ...to be continued

 

MARCH 26: FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT - LAETARE SUNDAY
Father Albert Lakra
There is a story told about a little boy at church with his mother ...to be continued

MARCH 26: FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT
As we did last week, we are reading today from the Gospel of ...to be continued

 

MARCH 25: Solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord
Eileen Burke-Sullivan
I have always been struck by the simplicity of the Annunciation ...to be continued

MARCH 20: Solemnity of Saint Joseph, spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Maureen McCann Waldron
Jesus had a radically different view of God, one that drew so ...to be continued

 

MARCH 19: THIRD SUNDAY OF LENT
by Luis Rodriguez
For the second Sunday of Lent, we move from Jesus' retreat to ...to be continued

MARCH 19: THIRD SUNDAY OF LENT
On this Sunday and the next two Sundays, we break from ...to be continued

 

MARCH 12: SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT
by Joan Blandin Howard
Remember the first time riding a “two wheeler” without training ...to be continued

MARCH 12: SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT
For the second Sunday of Lent, we move from Jesus' retreat to ...to be continued

 

MARCH 5: FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT
by Larry Gillick, S.J.
In our First Reading for this liturgy, we hear of one garden, two ...to be continued

MARCH 5: FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT
In each of the three Synoptic Gospels (Mark, Matthew, and Luke) ...to be continued

 

 

PROPOSALS FOR MEDITATION - We want to offer spiritual texts, which can be of help to nourish our faith and strengthen our life in Christ: they are an opportunity to compare our experience with that of Christian witnesses 'old' and contemporary.

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Blessed is the King of Israel - Saint Andrew of Crete
We keep the coming feast of the Lord through deeds, not words - Saint Athanasius
Are we not all one another's brothers? - Theodore the Studite
Christ the high priest makes atonement for our sins - Origen
The mercy of God to the penitent - St. Maximus the Confessor
Hold fast to God, the one true good - Saint Ambrose
A Samaritan woman came to draw water - Saint Augustine
Friendship with God - William A. Barry, SJ
Christ and Moses - St. John Chrysostom
What should I give up for Lent? chocolate? ice cream? soda?
In Christ we suffered temptation, and in him we overcame ... - Saint Augustine
Biblical time: Chronos or Kairos? - Archbishop Christopher Prowse

 

 

 

 

sito web ufficiale: www.suoredimariabambina.org