MARCH 26, 2017: FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT - Cycle A



First Reading
1 Samuel 16:1b,6-7,10-13a
Samuel is sent to anoint David as king.


Responsorial Psalm
Psalm 23:1-6
The Lord is our shepherd.

Second Reading
Ephesians 5:8-14
The Ephesians are told to live as children of light.

Gospel Reading
John 9:1-41 (shorter form: John 9:1,6-9,13-17,34-38)
Jesus heals the man born blind and reveals himself to him as the Son of Man.



As we did last week, we are reading today from the Gospel of John. In today's Gospel, the healing of the man born blind invites us to focus on the physical and spiritual aspects of sight and light. In the first part of today's Gospel, we hear Jesus' response to a prevalent belief of his time: that misfortune and disability were the result of sin. That belief is why Jesus is asked the question of whose sin caused the man's blindness—his own or his parents'. Jesus does not answer directly, but instead gives the question an entirely different dimension—through this man's disability, God's power will be made manifest. Jesus then heals the man.

The healing is controversial because Jesus heals on the Sabbath. The Pharisees, the religious authorities of Jesus' time, understood that the law of Moses forbade work (including healing) on the Sabbath. They also have trouble believing that Jesus performed a miracle. To determine whether the man was really born blind, the Pharisees question him and his parents. The man challenges the leaders of the synagogue about their assessment of the good that Jesus has done. In turn, they expel the man for questioning their judgment.


 

The final revelation and moment of enlightenment comes when the man born blind encounters Jesus again.
Having heard the news of his expulsion, Jesus seeks out the man born blind and reveals himself to him as the Son of Man.
In this moment, the man born blind shows himself to be a man of faith and worships Jesus.

Jesus replies by identifying the irony of the experience of many who encounter Jesus: Those who are blind will now see, and those who think they now see will be found to be blind.

As in last week's Gospel about Jesus' encounter with the Samaritan woman, today's reading has many allusions to Baptism.

The washing of the man in the pool of Siloam is a prototype for Christian Baptism.
Through the man's encounter with Jesus, the man born blind is healed, his sight is restored, and his conversion to discipleship begins.
The man born blind gradually comes to a greater understanding about who Jesus is and what it means to be his disciple, while the Pharisees (those who should see) are the ones who remain blind.



Family Connection

When infants are baptized, parents, with the help of the godparents, assume responsibility for raising the child as a follower of Jesus. The process of maturation in the faith is much like the example found in the story of the man born blind. The man is cured of his blindness, a symbol of his sin.
Each time he meets someone after the healing, the man comes to a deeper awareness of who Jesus is. In a similar way, we who are baptized continue to mature in faith as our relationship with and knowledge about Jesus grows.

Invite each member of your family to draw a timeline of his or her life. On the timelines, ask family members to identify significant moments in their lives, especially their life of faith. Invite each person to reflect upon who Jesus was to him or her at each significant moment. How has each person's relationship with Jesus changed or matured? Then read together today's Gospel, John 9:1-41.
Note how the relationship between Jesus and the man born blind changes and grows throughout the Gospel. Pray together that your relationship with Jesus will continue to grow and develop, becoming ever deeper. Conclude by praying together the Lord's Prayer.








[Lectio Divina for THIRD Sunday Lent PDF]




da:
http://www.loyolapress.com/our-catholic-faith/liturgical-year/sunday-connection/fourth-sunday-of-lent-cycle-a-sunday-connection



 

 

 

 

 

MARCH 26: FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT - LAETARE SUNDAY
Father Albert Lakra
There is a story told about a little boy at church with his mother. He was a good little boy, quite and well behaved. He didn't ...to be continued

 

MARCH 26: FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT
As we did last week, we are reading today from the Gospel of John. In today's Gospel, the healing of the man born blind ...to be continued

 

MARCH 25: Solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord
Eileen Burke-Sullivan
I have always been struck by the simplicity of the Annunciation ...to be continued

MARCH 20: Solemnity of Saint Joseph, spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Maureen McCann Waldron
Jesus had a radically different view of God, one that drew so ...to be continued

 

MARCH 19: THIRD SUNDAY OF LENT
by Luis Rodriguez
For the second Sunday of Lent, we move from Jesus' retreat to ...to be continued

MARCH 19: THIRD SUNDAY OF LENT
On this Sunday and the next two Sundays, we break from reading the Gospel ...to be continued

 

MARCH 12: SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT
by Joan Blandin Howard
Remember the first time riding a “two wheeler” without training ...to be continued

MARCH 12: SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT
For the second Sunday of Lent, we move from Jesus' retreat to ...to be continued

 

MARCH 5: FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT
by Larry Gillick, S.J.
In our First Reading for this liturgy, we hear of one garden, two ...to be continued

MARCH 5: FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT
In each of the three Synoptic Gospels (Mark, Matthew, and Luke) ...to be continued

 

LENT SEASON:
On the Journey with Jesus, Our Compassionate Brother
Ralph McCloud
"When the disciples heard this, they fell prostrate and were very ...to be continued

Lent in the Catholic Church
Andres Ortiz
The season of Lent is a Catholic liturgicalliturgical season ...to be continued

Living Lent daily
Advent has a wreath. Christmas has a tree. Lent has Ashes ...to be continued

A Lenten retreat
by Fr. Larry Gillick, S.J.
Lent, spring, and the Spiritual life have this in common ...to be continued

 

 

PROPOSALS FOR MEDITATION - We want to offer spiritual texts, which can be of help to nourish our faith and strengthen our life in Christ: they are an opportunity to compare our experience with that of Christian witnesses 'old' and contemporary.

Christ the high priest makes atonement for our sins - Origen
The mercy of God to the penitent - St. Maximus the Confessor
Hold fast to God, the one true good - Saint Ambrose
A Samaritan woman came to draw water - Saint Augustine
Friendship with God - William A. Barry, SJ
Christ and Moses - St. John Chrysostom
What should I give up for Lent? chocolate? ice cream? soda?
In Christ we suffered temptation, and in him we overcame ... - Saint Augustine
Biblical time: Chronos or Kairos? - Archbishop Christopher Prowse

 

 

 

 

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